dynastylnoire

The basics are that for every one female-speaking character in family-rated films (G, PG and PG-13), there are roughly three male characters; that crowd and group scenes in these films — live-action and animated — contain only 17 percent female characters; and that the ratio of male-female characters has been exactly the same since 1946. Throw in the hypersexualization of many of the female characters that are there, even in G-rated movies, and their lack of occupations and aspirations and you get the picture.

It wasn’t the lack of female lead characters that first struck me about family films. We all know that’s been the case for ages, and we love when movies like The Hunger Games: Catching Fire and Frozen hit it big. It was the dearth of female characters in the worlds of the stories — the fact that the fictitious villages and jungles and kingdoms and interplanetary civilizations were nearly bereft of female population — that hit me over the head. This being the case, we are in effect enculturating kids from the very beginning to see women and girls as not taking up half of the space. Couldn’t it be that the percentage of women in leadership positions in many areas of society — Congress, law partners, Fortune 500 board members, military officers, tenured professors and many more — stall out at around 17 percent because that’s the ratio we’ve come to see as the norm?

OK, now for the fun part: It’s easy, fast and fun to add female characters, in two simple steps. And I want to be clear I’m not talking about creating more movies with a female lead. If you do, God bless and thank you. Please consider me for that role.

Step 1: Go through the projects you’re already working on and change a bunch of the characters’ first names to women’s names. With one stroke you’ve created some colorful unstereotypical female characters that might turn out to be even more interesting now that they’ve had a gender switch. What if the plumber or pilot or construction foreman is a woman? What if the taxi driver or the scheming politician is a woman? What if both police officers that arrive on the scene are women — and it’s not a big deal?

Step 2: When describing a crowd scene, write in the script, “A crowd gathers, which is half female.” That may seem weird, but I promise you, somehow or other on the set that day the crowd will turn out to be 17 percent female otherwise. Maybe first ADs think women don’t gather, I don’t know.

And there you have it. You have just quickly and easily boosted the female presence in your project without changing a line of dialogue.

Yes, we can and will work to tell more women’s stories, listen to more women’s voices and write richer female characters and to fix the 5-to-1 ratio of men/women behind the camera. But consider this: In all of the sectors of society that still have a huge gender disparity, how long will it take to correct that? You can’t snap your fingers and suddenly half of Congress is women. But there’s one category where the underrepresentation of women can be fixed tomorrow: onscreen. In the time it takes to make a movie or create a television show, we can change what the future looks like.

There are woefully few women CEOs in the world, but there can be lots of them in films. We haven’t had a woman president yet, but we have on TV. (Full disclosure: One of them was me.) How can we fix the problem of corporate boards being so unequal without quotas? Well, they can be half women instantly, onscreen. How do we encourage a lot more girls to pursue science, technology and engineering careers? By casting droves of women in STEM jobs today in movies and on TV. Hey, it would take me many years to become a real nuclear physicist, but I can play one tomorrow.

Here’s what I always say: If they can see it, they can be it.

Geena Davis on gender equality in film and television [x] (via wesleywalesandersons)
dynastylnoire
African-Americans are not merely another maltreated minority on the scale of non-WASPs. They are a community whose advancement was specifically and actively retarded by American policy and private action. The antebellum South passed laws against teaching black people to read. In the postbellum South, black communities were the targets of a long-running campaign of terror. The terrorists took very specific aim at the institutions of African-American advancement. They targeted churches. They targeted businesses. And they targeted schools. In the mid-20th century, as we have been documenting, it was the policy of this country to deny African-Americans access to the same methods of wealth-building, that it was making available to whites.

Ta-Nehisi Coates

image

(via howtobeterrell)

dynastylnoire

wherearchitectureisfun:

WAÏF: Where architecture gets occupied

The “Tower of David” is an abandoned skyscraper in the centre of Caracas which has become home to 3,000 people. In 1990, construction began on the Centro Financiero Confinanzas, a huge high-rise office complex in Caracas, Venezuela. Construction halted in 1994, after a banking crisis and the death of the building’s main investor, David Brillembourg. The 45-story tower stood vacant until 2007, when squatters began moving in, displaced by a massive housing shortage in Caracas. Authorities turned a blind eye, and the skyscraper, nicknamed the “Tower of David” (after David Brillembourg), is now home to more than 3,000 residents. The third-highest skyscraper in the country has been jury-rigged with electricity and water up to the 22nd floor. 

Photo by Jorge Silva (Reuters)

Source

dynastylnoire
dynastylnoire:

selfcareafterrape:

selfcareafterrape:

Survivors Speak Out is looking for submissions!
What is Survivors Speak Out? 
Survivors Speak Out is a month long event highlighting voices often not heard within the survivor community. The aim is to make a platform for people to get their voices heard and also to help other marginalized survivors to realize that they are not alone.
What is required to submit?
All submissions must come from marginalized survivors of sexual trauma. 
What does it mean to be a marginalized survivor?
While I couldn’t possibly list all the ways that one could be marginalized, I can name a few.
Survivors of Color, Disabled Survivors, Trans Survivors, Spectrum (Mogii, LGBTPQIA+, whatever your preferred word for the community is) Survivors, Male Survivors, Survivors whose assailants were women, Survivors whose assailants were other children.
and all the lovely intersections and varying identities that come along with it. This is not a checklist or a competition of ‘whose more marginalized’, as long as you fall in a marginalized community SSO will take your submission. 
Can I submit if I’m a non-marginalized Survivor? or if I’m a survivor of non-sexual trauma?
No. This event is specifically for Survivors of Sexual Trauma from marginalized communities.
While SCaR is an open place for all survivors- this particular event is not.
Why marginalized survivors of sexual trauma?
Because these voices are often ignored in favor of experiences that fit a more common narrative. In being ignored thousands of survivors are left feeling confused or like they are the only ones. While all survivors are valid, there are certain issues that some communities of survivors face more than others, as well as some completely unique struggles. Survivor Speaks Out hopes to help address some of the problems that these survivors face.
Who runs Survivors Speak Out?
While SCaR is now home to many mods of many different walks of life, SSO is run by SCaR’s founder Kris.
They are a 21 year old white non-cis disabled queer. 
What kind of Submissions is SSO taking?
This year SSO is taking submissions for these 6  categories:
1. Letter to yourself during the crisis period.
2. Letter to survivors in your marginalized community.
3. Letter to survivors who aren’t in your community. What do you wish we understood? How can we build a better support system for each other?
4. Letters to non-survivors. What do you think they need to know? Maybe you want to write it to a specific non-survivor in your life, maybe you want to write it in general, or to the ones at your school. 
5. Art. Poetry. Drawings. Pictures. Sculptures. Music. Videos. 
6. For the last option- I would like to interview some survivors who have done things in their communities. Maybe you volunteer at a shelter or for RAINN. Maybe you helped put on a domestic violence event at your college. Maybe you fundraised for the cause. Maybe you spoke at Take Back the Night.
When is SSO taking place?
The month of September this year!
When is SSO accepting submissions? How do I submit? Can I do so anonymously?
SSO will begin accepting submissions next week- starting on July Seventh. It will continue to accept submissions for the rest of the month of July and for most of August.
All submissions must be in by August 25th. September 8th.
You can submit either by Submitting to selfcareafterrape or by emailing selfcareafterrape@gmail.com. If you plan on submitting it straight to SCaR make sure you touch base with Kris first.
If you want it to be anonymous- that can be arranged.
Further Questions?
Can be sent to ssoquestions.tumblr.com. Any questions sent to SCaR itself will be deleted unanswered. This is to keep SCaR’s inbox from becoming flooded. The actual SSO will still take place on the main blog.

I’ve decided to extend the deadline for submissions a little bit because I remembered that last year a lot of folks forgot and then freaked out at the first of the month.  
We’ve already gotten more than a good handful of submissions and I’m delighted of what we’ve received so far, but I’m excited to see what continues to come through. 

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST

dynastylnoire:

selfcareafterrape:

selfcareafterrape:

Survivors Speak Out is looking for submissions!

What is Survivors Speak Out? 

Survivors Speak Out is a month long event highlighting voices often not heard within the survivor community. The aim is to make a platform for people to get their voices heard and also to help other marginalized survivors to realize that they are not alone.

What is required to submit?

All submissions must come from marginalized survivors of sexual trauma. 

What does it mean to be a marginalized survivor?

While I couldn’t possibly list all the ways that one could be marginalized, I can name a few.

Survivors of Color, Disabled Survivors, Trans Survivors, Spectrum (Mogii, LGBTPQIA+, whatever your preferred word for the community is) Survivors, Male Survivors, Survivors whose assailants were women, Survivors whose assailants were other children.

and all the lovely intersections and varying identities that come along with it. This is not a checklist or a competition of ‘whose more marginalized’, as long as you fall in a marginalized community SSO will take your submission. 

Can I submit if I’m a non-marginalized Survivor? or if I’m a survivor of non-sexual trauma?

No. This event is specifically for Survivors of Sexual Trauma from marginalized communities.

While SCaR is an open place for all survivors- this particular event is not.

Why marginalized survivors of sexual trauma?

Because these voices are often ignored in favor of experiences that fit a more common narrative. In being ignored thousands of survivors are left feeling confused or like they are the only ones. While all survivors are valid, there are certain issues that some communities of survivors face more than others, as well as some completely unique struggles. Survivor Speaks Out hopes to help address some of the problems that these survivors face.

Who runs Survivors Speak Out?

While SCaR is now home to many mods of many different walks of life, SSO is run by SCaR’s founder Kris.

They are a 21 year old white non-cis disabled queer. 

What kind of Submissions is SSO taking?

This year SSO is taking submissions for these 6  categories:

1. Letter to yourself during the crisis period.

2. Letter to survivors in your marginalized community.

3. Letter to survivors who aren’t in your community. What do you wish we understood? How can we build a better support system for each other?

4. Letters to non-survivors. What do you think they need to know? Maybe you want to write it to a specific non-survivor in your life, maybe you want to write it in general, or to the ones at your school. 

5. Art. Poetry. Drawings. Pictures. Sculptures. Music. Videos. 

6. For the last option- I would like to interview some survivors who have done things in their communities. Maybe you volunteer at a shelter or for RAINN. Maybe you helped put on a domestic violence event at your college. Maybe you fundraised for the cause. Maybe you spoke at Take Back the Night.

When is SSO taking place?

The month of September this year!

When is SSO accepting submissions? How do I submit? Can I do so anonymously?

SSO will begin accepting submissions next week- starting on July Seventh. It will continue to accept submissions for the rest of the month of July and for most of August.

All submissions must be in by August 25th. September 8th.

You can submit either by Submitting to selfcareafterrape or by emailing selfcareafterrape@gmail.com. If you plan on submitting it straight to SCaR make sure you touch base with Kris first.

If you want it to be anonymous- that can be arranged.

Further Questions?

Can be sent to ssoquestions.tumblr.com. Any questions sent to SCaR itself will be deleted unanswered. This is to keep SCaR’s inbox from becoming flooded. The actual SSO will still take place on the main blog.

I’ve decided to extend the deadline for submissions a little bit because I remembered that last year a lot of folks forgot and then freaked out at the first of the month.  

We’ve already gotten more than a good handful of submissions and I’m delighted of what we’ve received so far, but I’m excited to see what continues to come through. 

BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOST

decolonize-all-the-things

Daily reminder for all Black Women

msangelblackgoddess:

You are beautiful. You are powerful. You are intelligent. You deserve to be happy and fulfilled. You deserve to live a life filled with wonder and joy. Be proud. Demand what You deserve as a Black Woman. You have a right to Your desires and Your dreams. Surround Yourself with people who will support that.

thesassyblacknerd

heartsandsins:

i’m always seeing these girls with these beautiful ass breast and girls with this smooth skin and girls with these different colored eyes. and girls whose curls are always so perfect… along with their brows…

fuck that.

here’s to the girls that can’t master a twistout just yet. the girls with oily skin. and pimples here and there. girls with two week overdue brow appointments. the average girl who despite her disability still tries to feel beautiful. 

word.